Travels with my Goldie – A taste of island life

DSC04551A taste of island life…

Although we didn’t realise it our arrival coincided with winter shut down on Colonsay. Like a National Trust property in November- there was a sense in the air that dust sheets had been fetched from the loft and if you lingered too long you too would be covered over till next March.

However I caught my self wondering if this kind of exile would be entirely bad? Rugged landscape suited best to the gales of winter and locals who were down to earth and genuinely engaged with visitors.(For those interested check out some of the fascinating articles and books about islanders lives.) No resentment here on Colonsay to the screaming intrusion into their quiet way of life! During a brief stay we encountered amazing characters. Among them : the local who knew my childhood home; seasonal workers who love the life style of their adopted summer home and the shop owners who let us glimpse parts of their rural winter life.

Only a few miles wide and  with around 120 hardy inhabitants This out post is 2.5 ferry hours from Oban and 1 from the much bigger and busier whisky island of Islay could just as easily a whole world away. While locals went about their business Colonsay  remained still and silent except for the occasional distant call of grey seals against the wind and crash if the sea and the flocks of Canada Geese that seemed to track you all over the island.

My favourite Colonsay’ism’ was parking on a 3m x2m concrete slab next to a rough green. It turned out that the 1960’s style concrete bench  next to it held the islands total golf facilities: a laminated copy of club rules and. An honesty box lashed to the least exposed side . This in itself set it aside on many of the western isles geared up for tourists and Leisure seeking incomers.Apart from the airfield and two recycling centres (whose significance I may relate later) the harbour town boasts a grand total of :one shop, a post office, cafe,gallery, library, hotel with the only public bar and a petrol pump. Our arriving boat was shared by a local celebrity whisky writer arriving in a flourish only to be gone again in less than a day.

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On the afternoon that we left the hotel housing the islands only bar shut for the winter.Closing weekend appeared to be an event in itself. In little groups the locals dropped in to the bar to raise a toast to the leaving staff  and make the most of the last big screen match while the small group of remaining tourists gathered waiting to see whether the ferry would make it through the rising squall. What if it didn’t?( Shop already closed for the weekend and everyone else seemed to be off to ‘the big house’ for the end of season staff party.) There was little doubt that we would be rescued by the locals but it served to hilight that this would be a tough place without friends!

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Angus does Notts TV

Angus and I are in awe of the energy and enthusiasm with which Julie and David from Darwin Dogs have advanced the acceptance of Mental Health Assistance dogs in the UK. So, of course we were delighted when they asked us to join them for a feature about Darwin Dogs for Notts TV.

As usual Angus had a great time and thought that all the fuss and attention was rather good fun!

Here is the result:

Watch: Charity uses dogs to help people overcome mental health problems

 

Angus does Speedway GP, Cardiff 2017

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Angus loves local speedway… but this is an experience in a new league for him- literally! Speedway GP 2017 in Cardiff… oh my! After a quick trip round the shops it’s off to the Principality Stadium.  For anyone in the know speedway is noisy! If you are wondering what Angus thought to this check out his huge grin at the end of this video as he meets up with some Polish fans who are definitely in good voice😀

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You see Angus is by nature a gregarious doggie. He likes nothing better than to do a spot of people watching… if, as it usually does, this involves him getting an extra bit of fuss it is bliss!

Then it is into the stadium to our seats in the accessibility area ( to allow plenty of room for Angus to sit comfortably.) on with his dog ear defenders and ready to watch the fun!

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(Thanks for this photo BigWoofa)

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Wow – fantastic racing and although our favourite Tai Woffenden was out before final stages it was thrilling stuff. Although I have to admit Angus did miss out on some of the action for a nap (I have no idea how you sleep through speedway!) and to stock up on the attention he attracted! Another hilight for him was in true Winnie-the-Pooh style a ‘little smackrel’ of the traditional yummy lap 17 hot dog!

Many thanks to the stadium and security staff for making Angus’ and my visit a really positive and fun trip.

Cardiff Principality Stadium and Speedway GP 2017 – you both get 10 out of 10 in our accessibility rating- nothing was a problem and you went out of your way to help us.👍

Cardiff are really set up for this regular event- stewards even handing out trendy rain gear as we waited for our train to come in 😂

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Home to bed after a fantastic day. Sweet dreams Angus!

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…and what is it that he does for you?

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Getting out and about is something we can take for granted. Birds singing, sun radiating through the window becoming me outside and that glorious feeling of the whole day stretching out into endless possibility. Quick grab your essentials and off you go out into the world for an adventure…

Bang, the door closes triggering a whole new train of thought. Suddenly a cold breeze blows and the sun disappears behind a cloud. The mist has begun to descend. Recent science states that in people who suffer from ptsd and depression the brain reacts differently to triggers. The normal instinct to investigate a feeling, assess it’s significance and the ‘risk factors’ attached to it and produce a reasonable physical and emotional response are unfortunately overridden. Previous painful stimuli are remembered in this area of the brain stimulating the release of chemical transmitters alert sufferers that they cannot deal with this situation causing feelings of being overwhelmed and spiral into ‘meltdown’.  In 5minutes I am back inside the house. Mission abandoned. This is why having an assistance dog trained to recognise the initial physical symptoms of my meltdown or freeze is such a lifeline for people like me. Confidence that he will alert me in time to take action and guide me out of the situation make it easier to access the fresh air, exercise and socialisation that we are all told are positive for good mental health. It is indeed gauling that the very things we are encouraged to do to help ourselves can seem completely out of reach by the very nature of  depressive conditions. The irony of the situation is not lost on me and is the reason for this post. It does not need to be the help of a dog- anything that inspires positivity and provides a reason to keep going has to be embraced. If the dream you have seems impossible to achieve- be realistic but don’t give up on it. Take small steps towards your goal and just see what comes of it. The chances are it will take you further on life’s journey and you will learn something important to improving the quality of your life along the way.

Since Angus has begun to wear his work jacket I have had so much interest in his role that I decided it was time to write about it! The following is from a fb post after a trip to a local town event. Crowds, conversation and nowhere to hide. Soooo outside my comfort zone!
People: Aww assistance dogs are so clever. What kind is he?Had him long?
Me: He is my mental health assistance dog. We have just finished training. It took us two years.
People: Gosh I didn’t know they did that! How does he help you ? Dogs do make you feel calm.
Me: Yes they certainly do! To be qualified he also needs to help me physically. One thing he does is to recognise signs that I am having a problem. He is trained to alert me by licking my hand and guide me safely out of crowded spaces if I freeze up in the supermarket.

Today so many people asked me about Angus.We chatted to some wonderful people at the Heritage fair including: caravaners from Belfast, a school party from Sienna, Brummie Vikings, Roundheads and their horses all mingling with lovely locals. What is really amazing is that I managed to be in a busy place let alone to stick around and talk to these nice people. Something that may not be evident on the surface but has become so difficult over the last few years. This is just one aspect of how Angus has helped me to begin the journey towards good mental health.
It is time for me to speak out now. If you know someone who may benefit as I have – please spread the word. And of course keep talking about mental wellbeing. It really helps.
Finally I need to mention the unsung heroes. My unflinching supporter and darling husband Neil and Darwin Dogs CIC who give so much in time and expertise to train mental health assistance and canine personal assistant dogs.

https://darwin-dogs.squarespace.com

#mentalhealthassistancedogs#goldenretrievers

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Me and my assistance partner

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The definition of the assistance dog role is that of a partnership between a human and dog. Once formed both partners rely on trust in the other to provide what they need and eventually this trust becomes intuitive and enriching as they begin understanding what makes each other happy. Ok this is perfection and I know there are always blips on the way but you review, practice and move on learning more about each other along the way!

Trusting in another and developing a relationship where both parties gain from a friendship can be tough to achieve for those of us who live in a ‘mental health goldfish bowl‘ ( see below) *.

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* there is no collective term that I am aware of to effectively describe how it feels to live in a world where someone can either feel on show for being different or iscollated and alone even in a crowd- cut off by an invisible wall from every thing and every one that you love. So, for now I will call it the  ‘mental health goldfish bowl‘ .

Dog tales from Keswick

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This week saw us pack up and head to the lakes for a much needed tranquility top up. Torrential rain,wind snow and glorious sun made sure our short trip was full of drama and beauty. The soft light was perfect for photography and the people we met a joyful inspiration for my new street art project. Angus starts so many conversations and enables me to explore what makes Keswick buzz in such a unique way. Daily life for the locals and tales of travel and adventure from fellow visitors inspired some impromptu street art which I hope captures a little of the delicious atmosphere. There is something magical about the smile on a face or a far away look that opens the door to the mysteries that might lie behind it…

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Angus of course met some new playmates…img_5332img_5301

… Supervised by the local wildlifeimg_4975

Teasing – I won’t turn round for a photo!

img_5232A swan family inches away from us on the pier!

No Angus -this is not a real sheep

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That’s better- a local ‘Herdie’

… and took in the spectacular viewsimg_5306img_4925img_5434img_5337

Oh that light! Just look at how it bounces, sparkles and throws moody shadows, adding atmosphere to these street -photos and the stories that they tell.img_5180img_5183img_5187img_5192

I indulged one of my passions- photographing from strange angles and focusing in reflections in puddles.img_5091img_5068img_5099

… meanwhile Angus does what he knows best-relaxing!img_4934img_4860

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Many thanks to Dolly,Dawn,Steven, Max,George and Charlie for being so patient and allowing me to photograph them and share part of their days. It certainly made ours!